World War I
RAE ADAM ELLIS

The inscription reads
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
RAE.ADAM ELLIS
CAPTAIN 1 / 1ST MONTGOMERYSHIRE YEOMANRY
ATTACHED 25TH ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS
SECOND AND ONLY SURVIVING SON OF
RICHARD ADAM AND EMMA ELLIS
OF GREENWOODS STOCK
WHO AFTER TWO YEARS CAMPAIGN IN
EGYPT AND PALESTINE
DIED OF WOUNDS RECEIVED IN ACTION AT
RONSSOY FRANCE SEPTEMBER 22ND 1918 AGED 36
INTERRED AT THE MILITARY CEMETERY
DOINGT NR PERONNE
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Click Here Rae's Papers
It is 1925, and the Great War had ended in the Armistice seven years earlier, when a letter arrives at Greenwoods in Stock. It is from the Army and in it Mr. Adam Ellis reads that in the Anglo-Egyptian Bank, Cairo there is the sum of £11 7s 7d which needs to be repaid to him as soon as possible. There followed an exchange of letters and the money was repaid, it closed a painful chapter in the lives of the Ellis’.
Seven years earlier as the war was drawing to a close Captain Rae Adam Ellis was serving with the Royal Welch Fusiliers, having been with them on attachment from the Montgomery Yeomanry (Territorial Army).
During the war he had been promoted three times, having begun as a Second Lieutenant in August 1914, by November 1917 he had achieved the rank of Captain.
He had served in Palestine for two years, the campaign was important because it kept the Suez Canal open and this meant that colonial troops could arrive that much quicker than having to go via South Africa. His battalion was not able to leave the area until 1917 as there were simply not enough troops, but as that target had been reached so Capt. Ellis found himself on the Western Front. He died of wounds when in action on 22nd September 1918, how he died is not known as the battalion was not engaged in offensive work at the time, they had completed the second phase of the attack on the Hindenburg Line, and were involved again until 2nd October, by which time he was dead. What his record shows is that he was in the 20th Casualty Clearing Station and a telegram was sent reporting his death the following day and was subsequently buried on the Somme in Doingt Communal Cemetery. Doingt is a small village on the eastern outskirts of Peronne, on the left hand side of the D44 road to Ham and St. Quentin.
When he died, Capt. Ellis was 36 years old, he had come from a privileged background. He had a brother who had been killed some years before, so the loss of their only remaining son was a bitter blow, especially as we now know so close to the end of the war. His parents erected a memorial to both him and his brother, and this can be found in All Saints Church, Stock. As to his records, they are patchy, his service records are no longer available and what does exist is this correspondence between the Army and Mr Ellis. The record shows that when he died the gross value of his estate was £417 16s 6d, a great deal of money at that time. Why it took so long for the money in the Anglo-Egyptian Bank to be paid out, we may never know
For many people there is little known about the background work that the Army does to keep its records straight. One can imagine yet another army working behind the lines which support the every move of those in the frontline, yet they often go unrecognised.
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